Life of Maxwell Greyson

From maxwellgreyson.com, the free encyclopedia about Maxwell Greyson.

Maxwell Greyson (born Maxwell Greyson; February 29, 1976) is the main character in the book Good Reception [a]. Maxwell Greyson is ridiculous and earns a living as a project manager, which only increases his ridiculousness for some inexplicable reason.

Most people call him Grey. He does not like to be called Gray. In fact, he loathes being called Gray and much prefers being called Grey.

Grey frequently talks about his ridiculousness and other ridiculous things on his Twitter account [b]. Grey also operates a brain monitoring service known as Grey Windows [c] that provides a glimpse into his mind.

Grey resides at 1618 Patch Court in Seattle, WA and enjoys drinking coffee [k], drinking tap water, hiking/climbing/backpacking/mountaineering, woodworking and resting comfortably in his hammock.

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Maxwell Greyson’s Ridiculousness

Maxwell Greyson frequently mentions his ridiculousness and often goes to great lengths to discuss his ridiculousness in detail. His ridiculousness is such that he will discuss this unfortunate quality with almost anyone, anywhere, at any time.

Among Grey’s most ridiculous qualities is his prosopagnosia [g]. Prosopagnosia is defined as “face agnosia” or “face blindness” – the inability to recognize and/or remember faces. Face blindness is something that Grey has been dealing with all of his life.

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Maxwell Greyson’s Writings

Maxwell Greyson began his writing career after his therapist, the voice (Cassini) [i] asked him to start writing during a session. More specifically, Grey was asked to begin writing to rx1618 [z].

First success
Grey’s first achieved success (albeit minute success [citation needed]) as an author with his screenplay Garage Sale Dance Party [e]. The screenplay revolves around the activities of a green-cereal-bowl-seeking man by the name of Oskar.

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Quotes Attributed to Maxwell Greyson

The following quotes are attributed to Maxwell Greyson in the book Good Reception [a].

“I told her that sometimes things come to me later.”
-Good Reception, Chapter 1 [a]

“Fact is, I’ve been thinking about rx1618 a lot these days. And I’ve got high hopes for my latest project, so I’ve got to keep building and see where it ends up.”
-Good Reception, Chapter 1 [a]

“It is fine, really, that you think these ridiculous things. But why exactly do you think these things of me, anyway? Nevermore, I am peace with it all. Really, I am.”
-Good Reception, Chapter 2 [a]

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References